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Expanding Our Roots

New Studio Woodworking Program Offered at Okanagan College
Okanagan College Media Release- Photos Courtesy of Tim Diebert

Where are the lines between technical talent, craftsmanship and artistic undertaking when you’re working with wood? There isn’t a clear answer, but for those who want to explore where those lines blur, Okanagan College is introducing a new program – the first of its kind in B.C.’s interior.

Studio Woodworking, a 35-week program, begins this fall at Okanagan College, and encompasses a wide range of woodworking disciplines. While the program is not an apprenticeship, students completing the program will get credit for Cabinetmaking Level 1 from the province’s Industry Training Authority. That can be applied toward a Cabinetmaking Apprenticeship.

“This is a program for people who have a passion for woodwork,” explained instructor Tim Diebert, who boasts 30 years experience in the woodworking industry. His work includes custom guitar making, boat building, custom furniture, yacht interiors, millwork, movie sets, and staircases and balustrades.  “It will appeal to serious hobbyists who just want to gain some new skills or turn their passion into a business. It will also appeal to people who want to find a career in the woodworking business and for those already in the business who want to further their skills.”

Those who are interested in the program can learn more about it online at www.okanagan.bc.ca/studiowoodworking

While promotion of the program is just ramping up, already there is interest from across the country, explained Diebert.  “It’s understandable. If you want to learn about woodworking and have to move somewhere to do it (there aren’t very many similar programs in Canada), then the Okanagan is a great attraction.”

Topics covered through the intensive course include everything from identifying and using different types of solid woods, to joinery techniques using both power and hand tools. Students will also learn how to use Computer Aided Design (CAD) software, will be introduced to computer-numeric-controlled (CNC) machining, and will learn about veneering, finishing, marquetry and inlay techniques.

The curriculum will also help students develop some of the business skills they might need if they are considering starting their own shop, said Diebert.

For more information, interested students can contact Tim Diebert via e-mail at [email protected] or call (250) 862-5457.

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