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National Forest Week 2003
Caribou
click to view large images


Display items:
Lichen, antlers, collar, overheads, 5 pictures (food/habitat/forest users/hoof pic/3 legged stool)

Handouts:
Crossword puzzle, tracking activity (Space for Species), 5 Billionth Tree Poster,
Story – “The Boy Who Found the Lost Tribe of Caribou”

Hook:

Overhead #1 – Quarter with Caribou on it.

Overhead #2 – Map of Canadian Caribou Habitat (where Caribou live).

Overhead #3 – Map showing Woodland Caribou habitat in BC.

Overhead #4 - Mountain Caribou.

Brainstorm – Ask students to name other users of the forest, besides caribou. Take 6-8 answers. Discuss the picture showing different users of the forest. (human uses – logging, mining, dams, power lines, tourism activities, snowmobilers, trappers, heli-skiing etc. Animal users – large and small animals, including predators of the caribou and other ungulates.)


Overhead #5 – Snowmobile tracts, Heli-skiing & Logging sites.

Overhead #6 –Education

Overhead #7 & #8– Small clear-cut blocks and Partial Cuts (Harvest Planning)

Overhead #9 – Collaring a Caribou.

Overhead #10 – Conclusion

Causes of Mortality in Mountain Caribou, 2001

 

Cause
Number of Caribou
Percent %
PREDATION
9
28
Cougar
4
13
Bear
3
9
Wolverine
2
6
NONPREDATION
17
53
Avalanche
8
25
Accident
6
19
Condition
3
9
UNKNOWN
6
19
TOTAL
32

 

Caribou Facts:

  • In Europe, caribou are called reindeer.
  • Moutain Caribou spend early winter at low elevations where big trees shelter the forest floor and their food from first snowfalls.
  • Mountain Caribou in winter use the 2-3 metre snowpack level at treeline to act as a platform to reach the lichens that grow on trees.
  • Mt. Caribou are the only members of the deer family that travel to deep snow in winter on purpose.
  • Lichen is slow growing. At high elevations, only the older, mature trees carry enough lichen to support Mt. Caribou.
  • Creating reservoirs can remove some of the low elevation habitat. The reservoirs can flood the productive forestland.
  • Old trees are valued for their size by loggers, their beauty by hikers, and their food source by Caribou. It is important to consider the needs of all users when managing the forest.
  • Highways and railways can be barriers to the traditional corridors used by Mountain Caribou.
  • Increased access to the backcountry can affect the habitat of the caribou.
  • Research is key to better understanding of and protection for the Mountain Caribou.